WSU to Study Iraq Toxins' Effect

Spokesman-Review
by Bert Caldwell


Research to examine how exposure might damage offspring of soldiers

Washington State University scientists will use a $1.7 million grant to study what multi-generation genetic damage might be done by toxins U.S. troops could encounter in Iraq.

The research using laboratory rats, not humans, will be the first for the military to examine the epigenetic effects of pesticides, herbicides and other compounds, said lead scientist Michael Skinner, director of the university's Center for Reproductive Biology.

Previous studies have looked at the health effects of other substances, notably the Agent Orange used to defoliate jungles in Vietnam, on the soldiers directly exposed, he said, not on their children or grandchildren.

"The science really had not caught up with the trans-generational stuff," said Skinner, one of several WSU pioneers in the field of epigenetic, or multi-generational, inheritance.

Besides herbicides and pesticides – which and in what combinations has not been determined – the study also will look at the effects of explosives residues, he said.

The four-year study will allow researchers to see how any changes in genetic chemistry that develop are passed along through two subsequent generations of rats, he said, noting that only the first two years of research have been funded.

Among the problems that might develop are kidney disease, or changes in the male and female reproductive organs, he said.

If any genetic markers are identified in rats, Skinner said, follow-up research could look at whether they might show up among members of the military as well.

That would be of particular interest to Dave Holmes, interim chief operating officer of the Institute for Systems Medicine, which was awarded the U.S. Department of Defense grant passed through to Skinner.

Holmes' son, Tim Hammond, did two tours in Iraq with the U.S. Marine Corps.

"They sprayed all kinds of stuff on them," Holmes said.

Although the grant money, the first awarded ISM, will fund work in Pullman, he said the organization's supporters hope any subsequent clinical studies will be done in Spokane.

"There's a lot of excitement about making it happen," he said.
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The Team Behind the
Naming of Mt. KIA/MIA

Bruce Salisbury, MSGT, USAF (Retired) joined the service at 15, after his mother refused to allow him to play high school football. It seems his stubborn streak has served him well through the years and in his effort to have a mountain named for our KIA/MIA’s. He has worked tirelessly, overcoming varied objections and finally his labor for those he holds in such high esteem has borne fruit….Mount KIA/MIA is now, after 5 long years, officially the name of a peak located in Saguache County, CO.

When Bruce started his quest he attempted to have one of 33 mountains (within CO) with the name Sheep Mountain, renamed, but met with resistance. So, he looked for a suitable peak that was without a designated name figuring there would be no real reason for refusal. He was right; there was no real reason for refusal, but plenty of resistance just the same.
 
One of the biggest objections to overcome was presented by the Bureau of Land Management in July of 2005. They voiced concern about naming a feature with a U.S. Military commemorative subject matter, being in the midst of many features commemoratively named after Native Americans such as Chipeta. Andrew Cowell, a linguist who specializes in Native American languages, stated that the name “KIAMIA” could be construed and possibly misrepresented as a garbled Ute name.

Bruce contacted Thomas Givon, Distinguished Professor (emeritus) of Linguistics and Cognitive Science, University of Oregon, who had worked for the Southern Ute Tribe for 10 years (1975-1985) as the founding director of the Ute Language Program. During his work with the tribe, he was responsible for putting together the three basic books about the Ute language. Following his retirement, he returned to reside on the S. Ute Reservation near Ignacio, Colorado. He maintained his interest in the Ute language and culture, and kept in personal contact with tribal members who still speak the language. After consultation with several Ute speakers, he determined that indeed the compound name Kiya-miya is meaningful in Ute, provided a place-name suffix (ending) is added to it, the full name thus revealing Kiya'-miya-vat. The meaning of such a name in Ute is then, "place where people walk about playing," or "place where people walk about laughing.” The verb stem kiya means, "To play," or "to laugh" in the Ute language. The verb stem miya means, "to walk around" (plural form) or "to do something while walking about" (plural form).  It is his opinion that Kiya-miya-vat is a rather appropriate name for a mountain that would honor Ute, and all veterans. A warrior, once departed, crosses to "the other side," a place often described as one where a person may walk about in peace, without care, happy; in other words, " a place where people walk about laughing.”

































This main objection being overcome left the board with little room for argument, so in October of 2006 the name was adopted by the Colorado and National Names Board. From that time until now the Forest Service had not given their blessing to the project, however, just days before the annual COGNA conference in October it was received, and the name was unanimously approved. It has been a long battle, but the victory is sweet.

Mt. KIA/MIA is located in Saguache County, CO close to Marshall Pass, from which one can see the mountain close-up. Rainbow Trail, passes over the Continental Divide, and crosses the Colorado Trail about a mile away, and then it drops onto the south side Mt. KIA/MIA to descend into the stream course of Silver Creek, later emerging to climb out near to Poncha Pass and proceed down the Sangre de Christo Mountain Range. There are jeep trails on both sides of this mountain which in winter become snowmobile trails, so it can be "near accessed" year around. You can easily view Mt KIA/MIA from highway 285 at the top of Poncha Pass as well.






























Bruce noted that this monument will be here for the lifetime of our generation and continuing ones and be a symbol that will be covered with snow, washed with summer rain, warmed in the summer sun, and will change subtly over the centuries but forever be dedicated to America’s killed and missing in action, from all five armed services and all of our wars. When an American warrior falls, his family and friends can “go to the mountain” and not have to wait for years to have a memorial to their war constructed.

The arrangements for official ceremonies haven’t been finalized yet, but Bruce may make the journey to the mountain with his wife and a few close friends without all the pomp and circumstance. For years he has had dog tags engraved with the names of those he wants to honor and remember at this mountain, adding to his collection way too often along the way. It gives him peace of mind knowing that they and their loved ones now have an enduring monument, where those who wish to pay tribute and remember may enjoy the beauty and serenity; perhaps finding a measure of peace as well. 
Bruce Salsibury
Bruce Salisbury holding dog tags of those he will honor at
Mt. KIA/MIA
Mt. KIA/MIA

Mt KIAMIA
  How It Came To Be
Bruce Salisbury

For some four years now I have been asking the "Colorado Geographic Names Board" to allow us to name a tall Colorado mountain in honor of America's killed-in-action / missing-in-action, from all American Armed Forces, and from all our countries wars. This quest seems to have culminated in once again being told, ”NO”.
 
I suspect that if the citizens of the state of Colorado were allowed to vote on this proposal, it might well be accepted, but these "board members" are appointed, and they seem to march to their own chosen drummer, and the band is small, and leaning to the left.     
 
Four years is a long time to work for something, and while their first refusal made sense, because they just did not want to change the name of one of their thirty three "Sheep Mountains" (within the borders of Colorado). This latest "turn down" makes me see red. I will let you share the "minutes" from their July 2005 meeting(see below ), to which I was not invited. I have never been contacted by any "board member" and have only managed to get a copy of this set of minutes because a friend sent it to me a few days ago.
 
Several of the points I wish to make are as follows: "The board" refers to the mountain chosen  as a "significant rock outcropping”, though it is 11,282 feet tall, and has a stream on each side of it to define it. Starvation Creek, which then meets Poncha Creek, flows around the north side of the mountain, while Silver Creek flows along the south side, where they join. To me, and the National Geographic Names Board, it is a mountain!

To call it a rock outcropping is bizarre. In the next paragraph, it is stated that "the new chosen feature would be considered insignificant when considering the importance of such a memorial". Where else on the face of the earth is an 11,282 ft. high mountain considered a rock outcropping?
 
Actually, this rock strewn mountain is covered with conifers, and is much too high for me to climb, since I am now  old and frail. Of course, it is "rocky", but why the hell would we want to build a permanent memorial on a "sand pile"? One of the nice features of this mountain is that it can be accessed, within a few footsteps. It has a nice parking lot on the well maintained, county road 200, just at the east end of the mountain. The last time we drove up there, I admired the "mountain base" from the parking lot, and thought that it would be nice to sit on a rock, under the shade of a tree on that mountainside, and that someone in a wheelchair could visit there quite easily.
 
Another aspect of this handsome mountain, is that it does not have an English name, nor a Spanish name, nor any nickname so far as we can determine.
 
Going beyond this point, we also chose this mountain because the County Commission of Saguache County are quite willing to have this mountain called "Mount Kiamia" (with the concurrence of the powers that be). The "board" says that, "The county has stated that they have no objection," which is a far cry from the immediate and enthusiast acceptance freely given by the county.
 
Another important consideration in choosing this site was the expectation that it would receive a lot of visitors, and while there were higher and more exciting peaks without names, this mountain has "near access", which means it can be touched by anyone, no matter how old or feeble they might be. We are not all "mountain climbers" you know. Even with the near access, there are no roads or heavily traveled trails atop this mountain, and that is as it should be. Close access is good - stomping all over that lovely mountain is bad. I am sure there will be people who'd like to hike to the top, salute those fallen heroes, take photos to share with others, and come back down. God bless those still strong enough to climb up there.
 
Also, we chose this mountain because it is close enough to infrastructure that people can stay in nearby Salida, or in Saguache Colorado, and sleep within a few minutes of the mountain. You can easily view this tall mountain from highway 285 at the top of Poncha Pass, and this might be as close as many folks would care to approach. They might just read a roadside sign, take a photo, and get on with their lives.
 
I expect that if this mountain becomes Mount Kiamia, then the cities of Salida, and Saguache, and other towns nearby, might need to build more motels and restaurants. Maybe some  more jeep tour companies to facilitate guests who might come there to view this mountain, and honor the family members and friends who died fighting for America.
 
This mountain is close to Marshall Pass, from which one can see the mountain close-up. Rainbow Trail too, passes over the Continental Divide, and crosses the Colorado Trail about a mile from here, then, it drops onto the south side of this mountain to descend into the stream course of Silver Creek, later emerging to climb out near to Poncha Pass and proceed down the Sangre de Christo Mountain Range. There are jeep trails on both sides of this mountain which in winter become snowmobile trails, so it can be "near accessed" year around.
 
Area trails are available for mountain biking as well as horse and mule riding. In winter there are groomed snowmobile trails on all sides of the mountain.
 
From the top of this unnamed mountain, one can see yet another "Sheep Mountain" to the south, just across Silver Creek. Not that far away to the southwest, and easily seen from that mentioned Sheep Mountain" there is yet another, "Sheep Mountain". Oh yes, Colorado has herds of Sheep Mountains, and lots of "unnamed mountains", and I'd love to see one of them named "Mount Kiamia" to honor all our KIA / MIA.
 
I still hope that Colorado will allow us to name a mountain as "Mount Kiamia", and we will continue to work toward that end!
What Does Kiamia mean in Ute?

TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN:

I understand that Mr. Bruce L. Salisbury with a group of other veterans are proposing to name a hitherto unnamed peak in the San Isabel National Forest, between Saguache and Poncha Springs, Colorado, "Mount Kia-Mia". I have been asked by Mr. Salisbury to determine whether the name "Kia-Mia" has any meaning in the Ute lanhguage. The mountain peak to be thusly named indeed falls within traditional range of the three southern Ute bands(Moghuach, Kapuuta, Wimunuuch).

I worked for the So. Ute Tribe for 10 years (1975-1985) as the founding director of the Ute Language Program. During my work with the tribe, I was responsible for putting together the three basic books about the Ute language: Ute Dictionary (1979), Ute Reference Grammar (1980), and Ute Traditional Narratives (1985). The three books were published by the tribe under the rubric of Ute Press, Ignacio, CO All my knowledge of the Ute language comes from working with various tribal elders, all of them fluent speakers the language, most of them gone now. Following my retirement from the University of Oregon, I return to reside on the So Ute Reservation near Ignacio, Colorado. I have maintained my interest in the Ute language and culture, and have kept in personal contact with tribal members who still speak the language.

After consultation with several Ute speakers, I am in the position to determine that indeed the compound name Kiya-miya is meaningful in Ute, provided a place-name suffix (ending) is added to it, the full name thus revealing Kiya'-miya-vat. The meaning of such a name in Ute is then"place where people walk about playing" or "place where people walk about laughing". The verb stem kiya means "to play" or "to laugh" in the Ute language. The verb stem miya means "to walk around" (plural form)or "to do something while walking about" (plural form).

Finally, from my--admittedly limited--knowledge of Ute culture, and being myself a veteran, I would say that Kiya-miya-vat is a rather appropriate name for a mountain that would honor Ute veterans. A warrior, once departed, crosses to "the other side, "a place often described as one where a person may walk about in peace, without care, happy; in other words, " a place where people walk about laughing".

Sincerely,

Thomas Givon
Distinguished Professor (emeritus) of Linguistics and Cognitive Science
University of Oregon, Eugene, OR
Colorado Board of Geographic Names
Minutes of the July 18th, 2005 Meeting
Boulder, Colorado
Board members in attendance:
William Bright       University of Colorado-Boulder
Andrew Cowell     University of Colorado -Boulder
Terry Ketelsen        Colorado State Archives
Bob Malcolm           United States Forest Service
George Orlowski   Colorado State Archives
Sally Pearce             Colorado Department of Transportation

NEW BUSINESS:
Mount KIAMIA Saguche County

The proposed name would honor those service men and women killed in action(KIA) and those missing in action(MIA). This is the second proposal submitted by the applicant. The new proposed location is a significant rock outcropping lying west of Poncha Pass in the San Isabel National Forest. Saguche County has stated that they have no objection to the naming proposal. The Bureau of Land Management has voiced concern about naming a feature with a U.S. Military commemorative subject matter, which lies in the midst of many features commemoratively named after Native Americans such as Chipeta. Being in a location surrounded by Native American names. Andrew Cowell, a linguist who specializes in Native American languages, stated that the name “KIAMIA” could be construed and possibly misrepresented as a garbled Ute name. Also discussed was the use of an acronym as opposed to a proper noun. The use of all capital letters, which would draw immediate attention to the feature, and that the new chosen feature should be considered insignificant when considering the importance of such a memorial, and that for such an important cause a feature should reflect a higher magnitude of scale.

With due respect for patriotism and all of those killed in action and missing in action as a result of our nation’s conflicts, William Bright motioned, seconded by Sally Pearce and voted unanimously to not endorse the naming proposal.

SPECIAL NOTE: Bob Malcolm requested and did abstain from voting on this proposal
Then Came theGood News!

Good Monday morning Bruce.

Having just returned last night from the annual COGNA conference (this year in Lexington, KY), I'm pleased to report that the BGN approved the proposal for "Mount KIA/MIA."  After last year's debate and all the waiting for comments from various parties, I have to say there was very little discussion this year and it seemed the members were more than happy to just approve the name in its amended form.  We received the "okay" from the Forest Service just days before the meeting, so I was able to add it to the agenda at the last moment.  By the way, the approval was unanimous.

You should receive a formal letter of notification from the BGN in the next couple of weeks, and I will try to inform all the folks who sent us e-mails as well. 

Also, the new name has already been entered into GNIS, the official names database, which you can view at http://geonames.usgs.gov/domestic/index.html (Under Domestic Names, Search GNIS on the left, then type the name in the Feature Name box, and click Detail Report to view the full record.  Several map links on the right side show the location, although not the name yet of course).

Anyhow, apologies for the brief note, but I knew you'd want to know as soon as possible.

All the best, and I know we'll chat more soon....

Jenny Runyon
US BGN staff
MT KIA MIA Memorial Coin
Americas Mountain MT KIAMIA
Here is a good setup to show where Mt. KIA/MIA is located, along with other data.
You can manipulate this map easily and it even shows you minute to minute weather.
Another interesting item I picked up is that the mountain which is KIA/MIA was 11,282 ft. when we asked for it, but has grown to be 11,295 ft. now and is shown as such on documents
Bruce has designed a coin for the mountain that is quite beautiful(below). If you'd like more information you may contact Bruce here: bsalisbury@acrnet.com
Proceeds from the sale of the coins will go toward a suitable monument at the county seat.
The aircraft in the video below was flying across Marshall Pass and flew right over Mt. KIA/MIA it appears.
This will give you an idea about how rugged the country is around the mountain.
Bruce
Climbing Mount KIA/MIA
by Bruce Salisbury

  On 6 August 2008 the first group of climbers to summit Mount KIA/MIA since it was named arrived at the mountain. They were, Royce Raven a Korean War Veteran, along with his son Barry Raven, a well known mountain climber, and Barry’s wife Raman.



















From the first time we discussed Mount KIA/MIA with Royce and Barry the two of them had offered to climb the mountain for us once it was named. These two were a part of the quest for naming the mountain from the very beginning and when the unnamed mountain in Saguache County, Colorado was finally  named, these two started planning their climb.

In the high country there is a short window of time which is considered good climbing weather and the snows come early and stay a good part of the year.

The Ravens drove to the top of Marshall Pass and descended to the Starvation Creek Trail Head where they began the journey on foot. They arrived at the top of the mountain shortly before noon and set up the flags of our five uniformed armed services and the American flag. This display was placed in a clearing at the summit where a jar held the climb register which was headed as follows: “Unnamed Peak 11,282 ft.”

  There were registered the names of two previous climbers. On June 7, 2003 Mike Garratt of Dolores, Colorado signed in and wrote the following: “2nd time here, 1st time on skis.”

  On 7-26-2006 Ken Nolan from Buena Vista, Colorado, signed in and wrote: “Pleasant open crest bushwhack.”
 
The Raven’s arrived on top as the first to climb the mountain since it was named.  In their notation they wrote:  “10-6-2007 renamed Mt KIA/MIA.”
Then they signed in:
8-6-2008 Royce Raven Bridgeport, Texas, Flag setup.
8-6-2008 Barry Raven, Coppell, TX. Flag setup 11:43 am
8-6-2008 Ramon Raven, Coppell, TX. Flag setup 11:45 am.
Below, this was written:
“Note, this trip was for Bruce Salisbury and all the veterans dead & alive.”
 
Royce Raven is a Korean War Veteran who has climbed many a mountain, but this one was special for him and Barry and Ramon, and for all who have been involved in naming this mountain.

After the climb the Raven’s met us at Home Lake, Veteran’s Center and we presented the flags for safekeeping at the museum there, to be held until there is a Mount KIA/MIA Museum, or other place to safe keep these historic flags.
























  Returning home through driving rain that night, Dottie and I enjoyed the knowledge that the mountain had just been climbed and  that the flags had beenflown up there, but, being me, I am already looking at getting a memorial effort going for Farmington, New Mexico’s Orphan Marine Kenneth Lee Worley who died in Vietnam four decades ago and achieved the Congressional Medal Of Honor.

Went up to Colorado and Royce Raven and his son and daughter-in-law climbed the mountain and held a ceremony on top. Barry Raven found an old cairn up there with notes from the two previous climbers ( from some years back). but Royce and his family were the first to climb after the mountain was named Mt. KIA/MIA.

Barry and his dad had climbed Kilimanjaro ( in Africa) back in 2001 and Barry is really a fine young man. Barry's wife "Raman" also climbed with them, so again we are on the cutting edge here. A 106 lb. girl atop the mountain. ( as you know I have a lot of respect for girls).

They took a slew of pictures and all five Uniformed Services Flags and of course Old Glory were part of their ceremony up there. Dottie and I did not climb but were at the bottom of the mountain while those three topped the mountain. It is nice to know it is completed now and these two guys who offered to climb the first "Sheep Mountain"that  we tried to name, will now be famous in mountaineering circles as the "first" to climb KIA/MIA
Click on the icon below for a great power point presentation, prepared by Royce Raven,  that shows the best trail to reach the summit of Mt. KIA/MIA.
He  has also included some beautiful pictures! Enjoy...
MT KIAMIA
"There are many veterans trying to reconnet with friends from the past and to find people on the internet can be difficult. If you are trying to find a old friend from the past, don't stop your search because many people are reuniting everyday!"
More Assorted Information About the Process of Naming 
Mt. KIA/MIA
Video of Mt KIA/MIA from  Above Here
How to Name A mountain
The Home Lake Veterans Center which is safeguarding the Mount KIA/MIA flags that were carried to the top of Mount KIA/MIA has built a nice flag stand to display the flags.
It is hoped than when a Mount KIA/MIA Museum becomes a reality the flags will be transferred there.
So I picked up my American Legion Magazine........today.......and read that I am vaguely mentioned in a story about Mount KIA/MIA.

How considerate!

To that small group of veterans (or not) who claim to have made out the paperwork to name the mountain, submitting the "application" to US Bureau of Land Management". I sure as hell don't think BLM has the authority for naming mountains!

A self -appointed four person group dedicated the mountain out there in the "pucker-brush" near to Villa Grove,CO .  They had an American Flag, a Colorado State Flag, Native American Flags and an Amvets Flag and a total assembly of maybe 75 people to this historical event. Where were the flags of the FIVE Uniformed Armed Services? What did their odd assembly have to do with a national event? 

Where I come from we can get 75 people to a fist-fight, an impromptu strip- tease, or a car wreck.

These people did not advertise nationally because they would have been found out as amateurs. They hired photographers and entertainers and plagiarized the writings of Bruce Salisbury. Editor Clairice Still of Veteran's Voice Newspaper and others. They took the entire story about the meaning of the Ute Combination Word Kia`-Mia`-Vat right off the wonderful paper written by Professor Tomas Givon, word-for-word and without attribution while presenting it as their own writing.

One thing they were good at was getting (untrue) news releases to media all over America, making false claim of having named this mountain.

Their assertion that: "the mountain was designated a national monument last October by the US Geographic Name Board" is also pure bull-shit!
The Geographic Names Board does not designate national monuments!

In a pathetically inaccurate and self-serving little news release which appears on pg. 64 of the Legion Nov. 2008 they don't know exactly How high the mountain is, but if you would like to access true information on Mount KIA/MIA you can go to "veteransvoice" online and there on the front page read up to the minute data on the mountain. You will also find a PowerPoint Program  to show you exactly where the mountain is located and information and maps showing how to climb to the top.

As far as I can determine, the group that Bradley Hight worked with and was "president" of, had no idea of where the mountain was located.

When asked by visitors to what they called a "First National Dedication of Mount KIA/MIA"  for directions to the mountain, they could not even tell them how to get to the "Forest Service parking lot at Shirley Site, which is at the base of the mountain and on a well maintained road. They confused a lot of people!

A Korean War Veteran who was a part of the small original cadre and who started helping toward getting Mount KIA/MIA named many years ago was kind enough to climb the mountain this fall, and carry Old Glory and the five Armed Service Flags to the top for a quiet service and a photo shoot with his son and daughter-in-law. Then they brought the flags back down and they are now displayed in the museum at Home Lake, Colorado, toward a time when there might be a Mount KIA/MIA Museum. They would then be transferred.

By the way. While the paperwork from the Names Board refers to the altitude as being 11,282 ft. We know that the altitude at the top is actually 11,295 ft. The mountain has grown a bit!

There will be an official Mount KIA/MIA website opening very soon and we will share that information with the world.

The site will be cared for By Barry Raven and is sponsored by my wife Dottie and myself, along with wonderful people who actually did have a signifigent part on the naming of Mount KIA/MIA.

Bruce L Salisbury
Copyright 21 October 2008


Setting the Record Straight -Mt KIA/MIA
Patriots for Profit  & Glory Story Here
Then the profiteers swoop in....